Three Vajras

Aganiya Sutta (Origin of the World, Genders and Castes), Digha Nikaya 27

Introduction Two young Brahmins, Bharadwaja and Vasethha, to whom the Tevijja Sutta’ (Digha Nikaya 13) first conversation is devoted, took refuge in the Three Jewels and began to live among the world renounced followers of the Blessed, preparing to be accepted into the Sangha. Other Brahmins strongly criticized and insulted them in every which way, arguing that by becoming a hermit, young men disgrace the highest caste to which they belong from birth. The relatives of Bharadwaja and Vasethha said that Brahmins are born from the mouth of Brahma, and wandering  hermits are born from…read more

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Cula Hatthipadopama Sutta, Elephant Tracks, Majjhima Nikaya 27

Praising the Buddha Hermit Pilotika greatly praised and glorified the wisdom of the Buddha. Pilotika told that the wisdom of the Buddha is clearly visible, like elephant footprints. Sometimes hermits, Brahmans, householders or noble people come to Buddha to argue with Him, to catch Him at any mistake, but, after talking with the Blessed One, they become His followers. Impressed by Pilotika story, the Brahman Janussonin went to the Buddha to talk with Him. Elephant and its footprints Having met with the Buddha, Janussonin told Him about the praises of…read more

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Vattha Sutta, The Cloth, Majjhima Nikaya 7

The Cloth and the Paint In the conversation with disciples, the Buddha compares a mind to a cloth, and the state of mind after the dissolution of the body – with the paint. If dirty cloth is dipped into the paint – it will be painted badly and the color will deteriorate. If a clean cut of the fabric is dipped into the paint, the paint will dye the cloth well, and the cloth will keep bright, clear color. The same can be said about the mind: if it is…read more

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Wammika Sutta – Anthill, Majjhima Nikaya 23

An Amazing Mystery On one night, a beautiful deity surrounded by radiance approached Kumara Kassapa, a disciple of Buddha. This deity gave a riddle to Kumara Kassapa: The anthill emits smoke at night and burns during the day. Brahman teaches the wise: “Dig the earth with a knife!” The wise man digs with a knife and digs out a Hasp. Brahman says: “Throw away the Hasp, and dig the earth further”. The wise man digs further and finds a Toad. Brahman says: “Throw away the Toad and dig further!” The wise…read more

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Akankheyya Sutta, Fulfillment of Noble Desires, Majjhima Nikaya 6

The name of the Sutta The literal translation of the name of the Sutta is “If anyone desires”. The Buddha explains the essence of right effort to realize non-egoistic desires. Regardless of the nobility of these desires, the Buddha speaks of them not as the goals, on which the mind of the seekers should be focused, but as the natural stages of purification of consciousness. Even the three Super-knowledges (of past lives, future reincarnations and the knowledge of eliminating hindrances and consciousness impurities) appear as the result of the impassive…read more

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Anangana Sutta, Absence of vices, Majjhima Nikaya 5

Introduction This Sutta tells us about two Nagas (the great beings), Shariputra and Mahamoggallana, the senior disciples of the Buddha, preaching the doctrine of eliminating vices. Vice is the presence of sensual thirst, anxiety and ill-will in one’s mind. The development of vices leads to rebirth in the Lower Worlds. The awareness of presence and absence of vices Shariputra said: when a person who has vices believes that they do not have one, they will not make efforts to purify the mind and, as a result, they will die with…read more

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Padmasambhava

Padmasambhava (born from the lotus), Guru Rinpoche (the Perfect Teacher) was one of the greatest teachers of Buddhism. He was born in India in the VIII century and in adulthood came to Tibet. It is believed that he is the emanation of Buddha Amitabha. Padmasambhava is often called the second Buddha as his life and activity significantly changed the appearance of Buddhism and gave it a new dimension. Padmasambhava brought Buddha’s teachings to Tibet, turned demons to protectors of the Teaching and paved the way for Dharma in Tibet. The…read more

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Bhaya-Bherava Sutta – Fear and Terror, Majjhima Nikaya 4

The Brahman’s Question The Brahman Janussonin asked the Buddha about what happens to the hermits, who retire in terrible, deserted places in the forest thicket. It is difficult to remain in seclusion to those who have not mastered the art of concentration. Is not the mind of the hermits who are inexperienced in the concentration, abducted with fear and horror that arise in solitude? The Buddha’s Answer The Buddha replied to the Brahman: “When I was young and only started looking for the Truth, I also asked this question. And…read more

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Huineng

Dajian Huineng lived in China between approximately 638 and 713 AD. He was the sixth and last Patriarch of Chinese Ch’an Buddhism.  The most famous text about him and his teaching is the “Platform Sutra of the Sixth Patriarch”[1]. Huineng was born in a family of a government official. His father died when he was a child and his family lived in poverty.  In order to provide for himself and his mother, Huineng sold firewood in a marketplace. Once, while he was helping his customer to carry firewood to an…read more

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Dhammadayada Sutta – Inheritance of the Dhamma, Majjhima Nikaya 3

Introduction The Buddha explains the difference between the inheritance of the Dhamma and getting the worldly benefits from the Dhamma, to his disciples. He instructs them in the Way of obtaining the true inheritance. Advantage of Ascetics A person who is content with being small and is patient with temporary samsaric difficulties has the advantage in inheriting the Dhamma. The Buddha compares two disciples – the first one, dependent on the feeling of being full (with food) and being dependent on energy bursts, striving to be satiated every day, and…read more

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Sabbasava Sutta – Spots of Excitement, Majjhima Nikaya 2

Introduction In a conversation with disciples, the Buddha calls bad, darkened qualities of consciousness “spots” and explains seven ways to overcome them. The spots that are discussed in the conversation are not visible by ordinary sight, but are perceived by the Eye of Wisdom. Therefore, the explanations given by the Buddha are not only addressed to the listeners’ human level of perception, but also to their divine sight. The order in which these spots are eliminated, presented in this sutta, is convenient for the sequential purification of the seven energy…read more

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18. Janavasabha Sutta

The attainment of the higher worlds by the deceased The Buddha repeatedly explained to the local people of those places where He preached, in what worlds the followers of His Dhamma, who left the body, are being reborn. Depending on the degree of purification of the mind, they rise higher and higher, into the worlds, increasingly free from unwholesome qualities of existence. Listening to these explanations, Ananda thinks thus: “It has been for a long time, that the Buddha did not preach in Magadha, where He attained Awakening. Therefore, nothing…read more

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Mulapariyaya Sutta – The Root of All Things, Majjhima Nikaya 1

The Buddha’s Sermon In aconversation with his disciples, the Buddha states that an untrained person, an advanced disciple, an Arhat and a Tathagata, perceive phenomena in different ways. They perceive the elements of form (earth, water, fire and air), bodily beings, gods, Prajapati, Brahma, the gods of Radiance, the Beautiful gods, the gods of the Perfect Fruit, the ruling gods, infinite space, infinite consciousness, emptiness, nonduality, activity of senses and mind, unity and division, the totality of all phenomena and nibbana – differently. Worlds listed by the Buddha First, the…read more

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17. Mahasudassana Sutta

Introduction The Mahasudassana Sutta returns the reader to that place and moment of the Mahaparinibbana Sutta (Digha Nikaya 16) where the Buddha, preparing to leave the body, lay down in a lion pose between the twin sal trees in Kusinara. Ananda asks the Buddha not to leave the body in such a remote, lost in a jungle village, but the Buddha stops the disciple. “Do not say that, Ananda. After all, there were times, when this place was the capital of a kingdom of a great king, the world-bearer.” King…read more

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16. Mahaparinibbana Sutta

Introduction The Mahaparinibbana Sutta tells us about the last period of the Buddha’s life, about how He gave the last instructions, left his body, and how His disciples behaved, being left without the Teacher. The content of the sutta is imbued with Ananda’s confusion (based on his impressions, the basis of the sutta is recorded). In general, it can be said that this sutta is written not so much about the Buddha as about the Sangha. Advice for Brahman Vassakara Already known from Samaññaphala sutta (Digha Nikaya 2), King Ajatasattu…read more

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15. Mahanidana Sutta

Buddha and Ananda talk about the Interdependent Origin of Suffering One day, Ananda said to the Buddha that although the doctrine of the Nidanas (the links in the chain of the interdependent origin of suffering) is deep and difficult, but he, Ananda, understands it as clearly as possible. In response, the Buddha warns Ananda: you should not say that, because misunderstanding of this doctrine makes the minds of people entangled and restless (one should not become flattered by the understanding he has reached, he must strive to penetrate the thought…read more

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14. Mahapadana Sutta

The Buddhas of the Past The disciples of the Buddha are talking about past lives. Hearing about their conversation, Buddha narrates about the Buddhas of the past. Buddha lists the six Buddhas who were born before him. The first of these Buddhas, Vipassi (“attentive”) lived in an age when a lifespan reached 80,000 years, the next Buddha – in an era with a lifetime of 70,000, then – 60,000, 40,000, 30,000, 20,000, until in the Shakyamuni era, life became brief, rarely reaching 100 years. With all the Buddhas described by…read more

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Lesson 12 – The stomach

The stomach in our body occupies a central position and is not accidental, because a nutritious essence is formed in it.  He takes food, splits it with juices of the pancreas and, further, in the duodenum, with the help of bile.  (Therefore, in the broad sense, the duodenum is called the lower stomach). The stomach is the brain of our torso, giving commands to all other organs for the timely supply of a substance. So  many different foods gets to the stomach & each must exactly pick the right substance…read more

Lesson 11 – The thin intestines and irregular yantra (An Irregular yantra is yantra too)

The thin intestines is located around the navel in the abdomen.   Absorption to the blood the nutrients from gastric digestion occurs in the thin intestines. This is the longest organ of all existing (6-7 m.). There is no exact location in the cavity of the abdomen for its parts, and for each creature it fits in its own way like a coiled serpent.  The walls of the intestinal hose are covered with a multitude of tube-sticks, through which the absorption of nutrients takes place. Therefore, its cross sectionis the main form of the intestine, which has the structure of the blobs. …read more

Lesson 10 – The Gallbladder

From the previous lessons, we have acquired that figures in yantras are not formed incidentally.  The circle characterizes mobility, the square characterizes fixidity and stability, and the triangle characterizes the process ofdirection. But, sometimes, the structure of the object of concentration does not fit into the right figures with a single center of symmetry in all directions, and then modifications appear.  In this lesson we consider the gallbladder in  yantra* language, as an example of changing the proper forms. The gallbladder is a follicle in which bile is temporarily stored….read more