Three Vajras

Anangana Sutta, Absence of vices, Majjhima Nikaya 5

Introduction This Sutta tells us about two Nagas (the great beings), Shariputra and Mahamoggallana, the senior disciples of the Buddha, preaching the doctrine of eliminating vices. Vice is the presence of sensual thirst, anxiety and ill-will in one’s mind. The development of vices leads to rebirth in the Lower Worlds. The awareness of presence and absence of vices Shariputra said: when a person who has vices believes that they do not have one, they will not make efforts to purify the mind and, as a result, they will die with…read more

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Bhaya-Bherava Sutta – Fear and Terror, Majjhima Nikaya 4

The Brahman’s Question The Brahman Janussonin asked the Buddha about what happens to the hermits, who retire in terrible, deserted places in the forest thicket. It is difficult to remain in seclusion to those who have not mastered the art of concentration. Is not the mind of the hermits who are inexperienced in the concentration, abducted with fear and horror that arise in solitude? The Buddha’s Answer The Buddha replied to the Brahman: “When I was young and only started looking for the Truth, I also asked this question. And…read more

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Dhammadayada Sutta – Inheritance of the Dhamma, Majjhima Nikaya 3

Introduction The Buddha explains the difference between the inheritance of the Dhamma and getting the worldly benefits from the Dhamma, to his disciples. He instructs them in the Way of obtaining the true inheritance. Advantage of Ascetics A person who is content with being small and is patient with temporary samsaric difficulties has the advantage in inheriting the Dhamma. The Buddha compares two disciples – the first one, dependent on the feeling of being full (with food) and being dependent on energy bursts, striving to be satiated every day, and…read more

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Sabbasava Sutta – Spots of Excitement, Majjhima Nikaya 2

Introduction In a conversation with disciples, the Buddha calls bad, darkened qualities of consciousness “spots” and explains seven ways to overcome them. The spots that are discussed in the conversation are not visible by ordinary sight, but are perceived by the Eye of Wisdom. Therefore, the explanations given by the Buddha are not only addressed to the listeners’ human level of perception, but also to their divine sight. The order in which these spots are eliminated, presented in this sutta, is convenient for the sequential purification of the seven energy…read more

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18. Janavasabha Sutta

The attainment of the higher worlds by the deceased The Buddha repeatedly explained to the local people of those places where He preached, in what worlds the followers of His Dhamma, who left the body, are being reborn. Depending on the degree of purification of the mind, they rise higher and higher, into the worlds, increasingly free from unwholesome qualities of existence. Listening to these explanations, Ananda thinks thus: “It has been for a long time, that the Buddha did not preach in Magadha, where He attained Awakening. Therefore, nothing…read more

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Mulapariyaya Sutta – The Root of All Things, Majjhima Nikaya 1

The Buddha’s Sermon In aconversation with his disciples, the Buddha states that an untrained person, an advanced disciple, an Arhat and a Tathagata, perceive phenomena in different ways. They perceive the elements of form (earth, water, fire and air), bodily beings, gods, Prajapati, Brahma, the gods of Radiance, the Beautiful gods, the gods of the Perfect Fruit, the ruling gods, infinite space, infinite consciousness, emptiness, nonduality, activity of senses and mind, unity and division, the totality of all phenomena and nibbana – differently. Worlds listed by the Buddha First, the…read more

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16. Mahaparinibbana Sutta

Introduction The Mahaparinibbana Sutta tells us about the last period of the Buddha’s life, about how He gave the last instructions, left his body, and how His disciples behaved, being left without the Teacher. The content of the sutta is imbued with Ananda’s confusion (based on his impressions, the basis of the sutta is recorded). In general, it can be said that this sutta is written not so much about the Buddha as about the Sangha. Advice for Brahman Vassakara Already known from Samaññaphala sutta (Digha Nikaya 2), King Ajatasattu…read more

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15. Mahanidana Sutta

Buddha and Ananda talk about the Interdependent Origin of Suffering One day, Ananda said to the Buddha that although the doctrine of the Nidanas (the links in the chain of the interdependent origin of suffering) is deep and difficult, but he, Ananda, understands it as clearly as possible. In response, the Buddha warns Ananda: you should not say that, because misunderstanding of this doctrine makes the minds of people entangled and restless (one should not become flattered by the understanding he has reached, he must strive to penetrate the thought…read more

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14. Mahapadana Sutta

The Buddhas of the Past The disciples of the Buddha are talking about past lives. Hearing about their conversation, Buddha narrates about the Buddhas of the past. Buddha lists the six Buddhas who were born before him. The first of these Buddhas, Vipassi (“attentive”) lived in an age when a lifespan reached 80,000 years, the next Buddha – in an era with a lifetime of 70,000, then – 60,000, 40,000, 30,000, 20,000, until in the Shakyamuni era, life became brief, rarely reaching 100 years. With all the Buddhas described by…read more

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12. Lohicca Sutta

Lohicca and his doubt Brahman Lohicca is in doubt that a person who has attained liberation from suffering can help another being. After all, he cannot convey to someone else the good qualities of his mind. And if it is so, when someone claims to be able to help another, is not this statement caused by greed (the desire to get this or that kind of personal gain)? Experiencing this doubt, the Brahmana decides to see the Buddha. Lohicca sends the barber Bhesika to consult about the state of Buddha’s…read more

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