Three Vajras

16. Mahaparinibbana Sutta

Introduction The Mahaparinibbana Sutta tells us about the last period of the Buddha’s life, about how He gave the last instructions, left his body, and how His disciples behaved, being left without the Teacher. The content of the sutta is imbued with Ananda’s confusion (based on his impressions, the basis of the sutta is recorded). In general, it can be said that this sutta is written not so much about the Buddha as about the Sangha. Advice for Brahman Vassakara Already known from Samaññaphala sutta (Digha Nikaya 2), King Ajatasattu…read more

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15. Mahanidana Sutta

Buddha and Ananda talk about the Interdependent Origin of Suffering One day, Ananda said to the Buddha that although the doctrine of the Nidanas (the links in the chain of the interdependent origin of suffering) is deep and difficult, but he, Ananda, understands it as clearly as possible. In response, the Buddha warns Ananda: you should not say that, because misunderstanding of this doctrine makes the minds of people entangled and restless (one should not become flattered by the understanding he has reached, he must strive to penetrate the thought…read more

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13. Tevijja Sutta – The Three Knowledges

Introduction At a time when the Buddha was in the village Manasakata, He stopped in a mango grove by the river Acharavati. At that time, many noble and wealthy Brahmins lived in Manasakata. They, each in their own way, preached the teachings of the Three Vedas. (The Vedas are ancient scriptures, consisting mainly of hymns accompanying ritual actions. The study and singing of the Vedic texts was practiced in among Brahmans). The two young Brahmans Vasettha and Bharadwaja had a dispute about which one of the known Brahmans’ paths leads…read more

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8. Kassapa Sihanada Sutta (The Lion’s Roar to Kassapa)

Kassapa’s Question The naked ascetic Kassapa asks the Buddha a question: Is it true that the Buddha condemns all kinds of asceticism (austerity)? The Buddha’s Answer It is not so, – the Buddha answers. By divine vision, the Buddha sees the following: there are hermits who subject themselves to severe trials (of asceticism), and some of them are reborn in the lower worlds after their death, and a part – in the higher. There are also hermits living only with insignificant burdens (without serious restrictions), and some of them are…read more

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5. Kutadanta Sutta

Kutadanta’s Question Brahman Kutadanta is prepaing to perform an abundant sacrifice. A lot of bulls, cows, goats and rams are brought to the sacrificial pillar. However, the Brahman wants to know from the Buddha what sacrifice will be the most successful. Therefore, accompanied by other Brahmans, he goes to the Blessed. Approaching the Buddha and sitting beside, Kutadanta asks him his question. The Buddha’s story about the King and the wise Brahman priest The Buddha tells him that in ancient times there was a rich and powerful king Maha Vijita…read more

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4. Sonadanda Sutta

Introduction From the top terrace of his house, Brahman Sonadanda sees a group of Brahmans heading to the Buddha and he wishes to join them. Other Brahmans who did not intend to go to the hermit Gotama, try to discourage him. They say that if Sonadanda approaches Gotama, the glory of Gotama will increase, and the glory of Sonadanda will diminish. This question will somehow disturb Sonadanda throughout the whole Sutta, because, as he says, the one whose fame diminishes – his wealth diminishes too, because wealth is achieved with…read more

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3. Ambattha Sutta

Ambattha Sutta contains two special moments: 1) the mention of the possession by the Buddha of an illusory body (this can be seen in the scenes of the appearance of Vajrapani and the creation of visions of the hidden signs of a great man by the Buddha) 2) a version of the story of Kanha (Krishna), which, in Buddhist sources, is also mentioned in the “84 siddhas of Mahamudra.” Introduction Young Brahmin Ambattha is sent by his mentor Pokkharasadi to the hermit Gotama in order to verify whether the Buddha…read more

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