Three Vajras

Welcome!

Our website is dedicated to the Three Vajras - Speech, Body and Mind. Buddhist Vajra is a symbol of invincibility. Since only the Good Karma is truly invincible, the Path of our school is the creation of Good Karma through Speech, Body and Mind. Here you can find useful materials that will be suitable for your practice - no matter to which school of Buddhism or yoga you belong.

Suttas will help you learn about the foundations of the Teaching, founded by the Buddha Shakyamuni. In the 'Heritage of Masters' section, you can find research on the experience of famous masters passing on the Dharma of the Buddha.

The 'Video' section will give you the opportunity to master the Mudra Yoga, which is accessible to people of all ages or any state of health. In addition, more complex practices of yoga and meditation are presented in the ‘Video’ section.

In the 'Books' section, you can download free guides and works of art dedicated to the practice of Dharma. Richly illustrated by our authors, the section 'Samaya' tells in detail about the ten deities of the mandala, which are the foundation of the Buddhist pantheon.

Let there be Good!

Eight Worldly Dharmas

A life, pursued by fears and  followed by pleasures, brings some suffering and it is called as Samsara. If the mind does not free from this race, he has been bound by the worldly Dharmas, like hands and feet of a slave are chained. Recognition of this fact is recognition Buddha Shakyamuni¢s First Noble Truth. How can the mind be freed from the worldly Dharmas? What kind of thought building can give an adequate answer as to stay at the point of rest between the pairs of desires and fears?…read more

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Mandala of the Pure Lands

The picture I drew below is called Mandala of the Pure Lands. There are five elements in this mandala. The mountain, river, lake, tree and the house. All five elements correspond to five feelings. What are the Five Feelings? The Five Feelings are: Mountain = Compassion River = Joy Lake = Peacefulness Tree = Giving House = Loving Kindness The first element is a mountain which represents compassion. It represents compassion because it has caves for people and animals to live and hide in case of a great need. The…read more

Akankheyya Sutta, Fulfillment of Noble Desires, Majjhima Nikaya 6

The name of the Sutta The literal translation of the name of the Sutta is “If anyone desires”. The Buddha explains the essence of right effort to realize non-egoistic desires. Regardless of the nobility of these desires, the Buddha speaks of them not as the goals, on which the mind of the seekers should be focused, but as the natural stages of purification of consciousness. Even the three Super-knowledges (of past lives, future reincarnations and the knowledge of eliminating hindrances and consciousness impurities) appear as the result of the impassive…read more

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Manjushri

Bodhisattva Manjushri belongs to the family of the Beautiful Gods. Soft, calm light emanates from him, absorbing all desires. Manjushri’s appearance is magnificent and shining. His fiery sword of wisdom is a sword of deliverance, not destruction, a sword that cuts the fetters, releasing the Great Void from which then the Shining Gods arise. Manjushri is the leader of the army of Shining Gods and is also their elder. He sits on the lotus throne, because the Beautiful Deities are born in the iridescent glow of the practitioners’ hearts. His…read more

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Anangana Sutta, Absence of vices, Majjhima Nikaya 5

Introduction This Sutta tells us about two Nagas (the great beings), Shariputra and Mahamoggallana, the senior disciples of the Buddha, preaching the doctrine of eliminating vices. Vice is the presence of sensual thirst, anxiety and ill-will in one’s mind. The development of vices leads to rebirth in the Lower Worlds. The awareness of presence and absence of vices Shariputra said: when a person who has vices believes that they do not have one, they will not make efforts to purify the mind and, as a result, they will die with…read more

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Padmasambhava

Padmasambhava (born from the lotus), Guru Rinpoche (the Perfect Teacher) was one of the greatest teachers of Buddhism. He was born in India in the VIII century and in adulthood came to Tibet. It is believed that he is the emanation of Buddha Amitabha. Padmasambhava is often called the second Buddha as his life and activity significantly changed the appearance of Buddhism and gave it a new dimension. Padmasambhava brought Buddha’s teachings to Tibet, turned demons to protectors of the Teaching and paved the way for Dharma in Tibet. The…read more

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Bhaya-Bherava Sutta – Fear and Terror, Majjhima Nikaya 4

The Brahman’s Question The Brahman Janussonin asked the Buddha about what happens to the hermits, who retire in terrible, deserted places in the forest thicket. It is difficult to remain in seclusion to those who have not mastered the art of concentration. Is not the mind of the hermits who are inexperienced in the concentration, abducted with fear and horror that arise in solitude? The Buddha’s Answer The Buddha replied to the Brahman: “When I was young and only started looking for the Truth, I also asked this question. And…read more

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Huineng

Dajian Huineng lived in China between approximately 638 and 713 AD. He was the sixth and last Patriarch of Chinese Ch’an Buddhism.  The most famous text about him and his teaching is the “Platform Sutra of the Sixth Patriarch”[1]. Huineng was born in a family of a government official. His father died when he was a child and his family lived in poverty.  In order to provide for himself and his mother, Huineng sold firewood in a marketplace. Once, while he was helping his customer to carry firewood to an…read more

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Dhammadayada Sutta – Inheritance of the Dhamma, Majjhima Nikaya 3

Introduction The Buddha explains the difference between the inheritance of the Dhamma and getting the worldly benefits from the Dhamma, to his disciples. He instructs them in the Way of obtaining the true inheritance. Advantage of Ascetics A person who is content with being small and is patient with temporary samsaric difficulties has the advantage in inheriting the Dhamma. The Buddha compares two disciples – the first one, dependent on the feeling of being full (with food) and being dependent on energy bursts, striving to be satiated every day, and…read more

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Sabbasava Sutta – Spots of Excitement, Majjhima Nikaya 2

Introduction In a conversation with disciples, the Buddha calls bad, darkened qualities of consciousness “spots” and explains seven ways to overcome them. The spots that are discussed in the conversation are not visible by ordinary sight, but are perceived by the Eye of Wisdom. Therefore, the explanations given by the Buddha are not only addressed to the listeners’ human level of perception, but also to their divine sight. The order in which these spots are eliminated, presented in this sutta, is convenient for the sequential purification of the seven energy…read more

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